uchilawgo’s GUIDE TO COURSE OFFERINGS

by uchilawgo

Advanced Law and Economics: Theory and Practice

LAWS 55401 – 01 (3) c/l

This is the most “University of Chicago” class offered at the Law School. Students will be expected to excise words like “fairness” and “justice” from their vocabulary in exchange for more useful words like “utility maximizing,” “efficient,” and “Coasean.” The class will use the administration’s graduation ticket policy as an example of inefficiency in practice. Seats in the class will be bought, sold, and traded.

Spring 2013

Anup Malani

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Art Law

LAWS 79301 – 01 (3) c/l, m, x

This seminar examines art, both homoerotic and heteronormative. The basis of the grade will be the student’s fashion as demonstrated by (1) their clothing, (2) perfume/cologne, and (3) accessories. The class will meet at 4 p.m. every other Thursday, except when preceded or succeeded by a holiday or Judge Posner’s cat’s birthday.

Spring 2013

Anthony Hirschel, William M. Landes

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Civil Procedure II

LAWS 30221 – 02 (3) 1L

This course focuses on the power of particular courts to decide cases. Students will learn that there are two types of courts, state and federal, and that they do different things except when they do the same things. Students will also spend a lot of time attempting and failing to learn the Erie Doctrine.

Spring 2013

William H. J. Hubbard

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Criminal Procedure I: The Investigative Process

LAWS 47201 – 01 (3)

This course focuses on the constitutionality of searches, seizures, and confessions. It discusses the importance of Miranda and probable cause for ensuring due process for criminal defendants. Students will also consider the constitutionality of stop and frisk. The student’s grade will be based on a project concerning police accountability.

Spring 2013

Richard H. McAdams

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Criminal Procedure I: The Investigative Process

LAWS 47201 – 01 (3)

This course focuses on the constitutionality of searches, seizures, and confessions. It discusses the obstacles presented by Miranda and probable cause for the swift distribution of justice. Students will also consider the utility of stop and frisk for reducing crime. The student’s grade will be based on a project concerning investigative efficiency.

Spring 2013

Richard A. Epstein

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Evidence

LAWS 41601 – 01 (3) x

This course examines the law governing evidence in criminal and civil trials. It will spend ten minutes discussing the hearsay rule, nine weeks discussing its exceptions, and one week on the rest of evidence law. The student’s grade is based on a proctored exam which consists of listing each of the hearsay exceptions in order of most confusing to least used.

Spring 2013

Geoffrey R. Stone

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Feminist Philosophy

LAWS 47701 – 01 (3) +, c/l, e, x

This course discusses works authored by radicals, women. Students will be expected to put economic efficiency concerns on hold in favor of discussing concepts like equality. The grade will be based on the number of times “privilege,” “gender binary,” and “patriarchy” are used on the final exam. Students registered for Advanced Law and Economics are not welcome.

Spring 2013

Martha Nussbaum

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Roman Law

LAWS 47702 – 01 (3) e, m, r, w, x

This seminar develops skills in analyzing legal conflicts the way the Romans did, with gladiatorial games, wrestling, and general conquering and pillaging. Students who are late or absent will be thrown to the modern day lions, the Office of the Dean of Students and/or Professor Levmore. As a 1L elective, it will be graded on the curve usually applied to 1Ls; that is, students must fight each other in the Green Lounge to earn a 178 or above. No knowledge of Latin required. Knowledge of Italian discouraged.

Spring 2013

Richard A. Epstein

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